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, delaware, illinois, indiana, kentucky, kentucky, kentucky, ohio, ohio, ohio, michigan, missouri and tennessee. some have suggested that this program has been slow to spend emergency funding provided in the f.y. 2000 c.r. the loan process ought to be strenuous. one company originally applied in 2006 and received an a.t.v. loan in 2010 and required four years of due diligence and reviewed to qualify for the loan. republicans seem to be shoing an ultimate umh. expedite the review process. by the way, the company in question employed 400 employees before receiving the loan. today they have 1,400 employees in the field of engineering research and development, design, manufacturing, assembly, maintenance and service, sales and support. the program has an additional 18 loan applications in progress that are projected to create 50,000 to 60,000 more jobs in california, florida, illinois, indiana, louisiana, michigan, missouri and ohio. one pending application would support investments at 11 plants in illinois, indiana, michigan and ohio. the company employs over 56,000 workers having ad
states supreme court as part of this. they opened the floodgates. it upheld the indiana law. there was not one iota of evidence introduced here. following 2010, a summit people stayed home. 25 million people who voted in 2008 did not of the ticket- estimated the majority was over obama voters. what happened was that this open the floodgates for these republican legislators to take control. instead of doing the job. instead of dealing with homelessness. instead filling with foreclosures. the number one priority has been to pass this voter rejection laws. they will continue to have political domination you not be able to vote. of we will slam the door to ensure our political government. they're passing these walls. you can only vote if you have one particular form of a voter identification. that is a driver's license or identification. most states allow you to share different items. he can show your student id. you can show your college id. you can share your utility bills. it is good enough to get them elected. now they want to slam the door and make it hard. it is estimated
. >> a viewer from indiana. good evening to you. >> thank you. i liked the president's speech. it provides a lot of different incentives for creating jobs, puts more teachers back to work. in indiana, with our budget crisis we had a couple years ago, had to cut somewhere. i wanted to see what the house will do with it. the republicans control that chamber right now. will they take up this plan, or how well they do it, and handed over to the senate, where i still believe there is some moderates there, especially republicans from maine, and hopefully they can get this passed. people are looking for something to get this coming up and running again. and running again. i liked the president's speech . >> nancy pelosi urge her democratic colleagues to push the committee chairs to move ahead with hearings on the proposals put forth of by the present. the president will travel to richmond tomorrow, part of the congressional district of eric cantor, and tuesday the president will travel to columbus, ohio, the back yard of the speaker of the house. an unemployed worker from kansas. good evening. >> good
, illinois, ohio, indiana, louisiana and florida. and so now the majority says they are going to pay for this bill. how? by ending a program that has created jobs. that's the reality. it cuts it off. even though there are applications pending that will create thousands of more jobs in the manufacturing base of this country. in indiana, missouri, ohio, california, michigan and other states. it's inexcusable. it's inexcusable. mr. woodall: will the gentleman yield? mr. levin: yes. mr. woodall: you may have some information that we didn't have in the rules committee. my understanding is that this program, which has billions that were appropriated in 2008 and have not yet been spent -- mr. levin: all right. you've been misinformed. you've been misinformed. there are millions -- millions and millions of dollars that are already in the pipeline to be spent and applications for the balance of that money. that's a fact. and so if you've been misinformed i suggest you go back to the rules committee and take another look at this. this is an anti-jobs bill when we needs jobs in the united state
weekly series "the contenders." live from his home in indiana, friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern. it a preview about him on the special website for the series, c-span.org/thecontenders. >> you should always start with an assumption if a politician or a ceo is saying something, they are not telling you the truth. they may be telling you the truth but the burden should be on them to prove it. >> he was an eagle scout, was briefly and editor of "mother jones" and created one of the three best-selling documentaries of all time, and his latest memoir is "here comes trouble." on "in-depth" you can call or tweet michael moore. then on october 3, the supreme court will start hearing oral arguments on whether states can be sued for failing to pay the required rate set by the medicaid act. on friday hear a similar case from 1990 arguing states cannot be sued by private parties to enforce medicaid compliance. arguing for the united states, supporting virginia governor wilder, the justice john roberts -- >> returning to the language of the statute. that language specified the state medicaid plan must prov
into the general fund. indiana, toll road. great success? i don't know. ask the people in indiana who use the money now. where did that money go? into the toll road? no. went into other transportation projects in the state. in indiana, tolls are going through the roof. you ask the users out there and it is a different story. maybe it goes back to the issue that if the money is dedicated into the infrastructure, that works. if it is bled off for other purposes, good government purposes, that is another story. user financed, user paid system. >> i wrote about this earlier this year for "national journal." one of the things i believe is from your staff that we were talking about that the real problem in public/private partnerships can be that you have big investors dealing in with local governments and they are very sophisticated. what mr. mica is trying to do on his staff is coming up with ways to equalize that balance a little bit and the other point i would make is the only -- only 24 states and the district of columbia have used public/ private partnerships. we still have -- it works in some place
on c-span. i was just asking a question. host: all right in indiana on our republican line, what do you think about the effectiveness of the presidential primary system? caller: well, i don't think it's effective since it's so spread out. to piggyback on a previous caller, the way that they vorkts instant runoff voting is a good way but the best way is range voting. it maximizes voter satisfaction. host: what's range voting? caller: it's a system of voting where you give a score to the candidates and then they average those and the ones with the highest average actually become that particular candidate. works in primaries and multiseat elections. host: all right. thanks, edgar. too much money wasted on primaries? we need move to regional primaries. january the, the east, march, the west. change vote day to saturday. "washington post" newt beginning bridge bolsters his plan. persistence has its reward. his presidential as operations has defied as operations, crept up in the polls and become a draw on the campaign trail. his tenacity has also bolstered his republican parties' idea brand w
, and the rest of them. host: we will leave it there. ron paul coming up again on twitter this morning. indiana. tom, good morning de caller: good morning. host: what do you think about the field? caller: i like herman cain. because i watched him on tv last week and he mentioned something i don't think a lot of people know -- the government is raiding social security to pay for a lot of other programs. and if they stayed out of that, social security would never go broke. and i would like to see a republican -- herman cain, ron paul, are anybody say, let's get out of the wars within one month or two months and stop wasting our money over there because it is not appreciated. i don't like ron paul's -- watching the debate, the last one, where he says get rid of minimum-wage. it would not create more jobs for poor people. what does he want them working for? $2 an hour? is that how we are going to compete with china? another thing, i don't see anybody in my party going after china on how they are cheating us all the time. they are stealing everything. host: mr. cain getting a lot of activity on twit
39,000 jobs in california, delaware, illinois, indiana, kentucky, ohio, michigan, missri, and tennessee. some have suggested that this program has been slow to spend emergency funding provided in the f.y. 2009 c.r. i say the loan review process is and ought to be strenuous. one company, tesla, originally applied under a different loan program in 2006 and received an atvm loan in 2010. it requires four years of due diligence to review to qualify for the loan and having read many of the press releases that went out when there was another d.o.e. program that was not -- that had ran into difficulties, i didn't note anybody there saying we shouldn't take time for due diligence. due diligence is required. by the way, the company in questi, tess la, employed -- tesla, employed about 400 workers before reiving the loan. today they have 1,400 employees in the fields of engineering, research and development, design, manufacturing, assembly, maintenance, service, sales, and support. the atvm program has an additional 18 loan applications in progress that are projected to create 50,0
of the model in indiana leasing a state highway? you think higher user fees are an efficient way of finding expansion or maintenance of roads? >> separating roads from public transportation is an important first step in giving more transparency and honesty in government accounting. that is helpful. i am an advocate of phasing out most, if not all, of the federal gasoline tax and allowing tax to take -- states to take those resources. when they see the guy doing -- syphon off to subways and to bypass and what not. they do not know what they can believe with the dollar that was supposed to go to roads. the extent you can turn those cards face up and say this is what we're spending on roads, this is what we are spending on public transit on the subway system, here is what we're doing. not in your neighborhood. transparent is very helpful. step one. >> the highway, and direct user fees more economically efficient to fund construction or maintenance. >> leasing in indiana made sense. i know there was an effort to pennsylvania. that would have made sense. you could have had $20 billion without of
the pennsylvania border to the indiana border. you also want to privatize the state prison. i don't know of any great authors of the turnpike. do you see those as long-term solutions? >> first of all, jack, we could have sold more prisons, but we're not going to sell for a bad price. secly, we sold one, and we did very well with that. in addition to that, we privatized more of the operations of these prisons. believe me, our director of corrections here in ohio was thrilled with where we are, because i think you know that the cost of correction facilities is sky rocketing. we have been able to get ourselves in the position to be able to change that. able to change that. to be able to first of all not only have the kind of reforms in the prisons like unit management, but also, what do they say, bend -- i forget the term they use. but we have been able to slow the growth. in some cases, like medicaid, we have been able to slow the cost growth. what we didn't want to do was sell something that in the long run wasn't the best deal for the people of the state. in terms of the turnpike, we have a num
is trying to follow the examples set by governor dan yells in indiana and that is to sell or lease the turn bike. that's the super highways that that's the super highways that runs from the border to border. you also want to privatize the five state prisons. so far you've only got a bid i think on one of the state prisons and i don't know if you've had any real great offers on the turnpike. do you see those as real long-term solutions? >> well, first of all we could have sold more prisons but we're not going to sell for a bad price. secondly, we sold one and we did very well with that and in addition to that we privatized more of the operations of these prisons. and believe me, our director of corrections here in ohio is thrilled with where we are because i think you know that the cost of correction facilities is skyrocketting and we've been able to get ourselves in a position to be able to change that, to be able to first of all not only have the kind of reforms in the prisons like unit management but also what do they say, to bend the -- i forget the term they use but we've been able to s
. indiana, kevin on our line for independents. go ahead. caller: my name is kevin and i'm 17 years old. and i'm not really educated as much as other people are on the programming. but one thing i do know, that the constitution it was ratified in 1789 to provide a framework for the governing nation composed of 13 separate sovereign states. and now there's over 50 states and so many laws have changed that it's just, i think it's so easy to mask things. like with oil, anything. you can mask it with paperwork. host: even as a 17-year-old there in indiana talk to us about how the significance of the constitution in your daily life. caller: well, i like the second amendment, because i like to hunt and i do believe in the right to bear arms. and another thing is that i'm an independent contractor so i pretty much, i want to be my own business owner and i love the fact that i can do that in the united states. that's honestly, i love the freedoms that we have here. i just think that a lot of the things in the constitution are masked. i don't know. host: thanks for your call. in this morning's n
a separate mass transit funds? and then on model in indiana leasing a state highway, and for both of you, do you think higher direct user fees are more economically direct and efficient way of funding either expansion are maintenance of roads and bridges? >> separate out roads from public transportation, that is an important fur step in getting more transparency and accuracy and honesty in government accounting. i think that is very hopeful. i am an advocate of phasing out most if not all of the federal gasoline tax and allowing states to take those resources and spend them. if a hard time telling people that you spend the money on the road when you see the guy davis- bacon, siphoning off the subways and to bypass and what not, and they do not know what they can believe and the dollar that they thought they were paying for roads. to the extent that you can turn the cards face up and say this is what we're going to spend on roads and what we're going to spend on public transit and station will never visit, and here is what you're doing. >> let me say. >> not in your neighborhood. going honest
in this morning. from lagrange, indiana. tim on the independent line. what did you think of the proposal? caller: actually, he had a lot of good points. listening to everybody this morning, it kind of points out the problem. either to the left or to the right. we need to come together. there is a place, a role for the federal government. we are the united states. it was proposals from the federal government that built the great bands like the hoover dam under eisenhower, a republican -- the great dams. the federal highway system, we pay for that with a small tax on gas. there is a place. we need to put teachers back to work. everybody knows that states cannot independently print money. it has to come from the federal government. that is what makes us the united states of america. everything that is going on -- i had a son who works in construction, building houses. he is unemployed. i had a daughter who is disabled, with down syndrome, so medicare and social security affects me. my parents are retired. all of this affects me. we have to come together as a country and do something. the private se
. it would have been rotten. >> why did he offer him his cabinet? >> he had some positions in indiana and other places and had some history of accomplishments. not a great deal. clay was expecting to get the presidency. it was a time when the whig party thought it would win. we policies look like they would be needed to get out of the depression. they had a great shot of beating the incumbent, martin van buren. this is one of the examples where henry clay is not a good politician. he had been in congress, but was not a good manager. he trusted his own instincts too much. he did not take the advice of other people. they got a rule changed in the condition that clay, who had the majority of the vote, now said they would vote by delegation. however the state voted, the whole state voted for that person. harrison realize that clay was very important in the whig party. he wanted to make peace, not have clay on the opposite side. clay basically said he would rather stay where he is because he thinks there are more important things to do there and he does not want to be associated with harri
for president and lost. our live look at "the contenders" continues next friday. we will go to indiana and talk with historians and talk about the presidential campaigns of eugene debs. for more information on our series, go to our website at c- span.org. you will find biographies of all of the candidates, the story and appraisals. that is all at c-span.org. next come up palestinian president abbas on complications for for palestine. then the at c-span series "the contenders" based on those who ran for president and lost. tonight from nebraska, william jennings bryan. palestinian territories president mahmoud abbas submitted a request for full united nations membership. he declared that the palestinian liberation organization and is ready to go back to the negotiation table immediately. he said that the negotiations would be meaningless if be israelis continued to build on land meant for the palestinian state. this is 40 minutes. >> ladies and gentlemen, i extend my congratulations to the president of the assembly. i wish him every success. i extend my congratulations on behalf of the palestini
governor romney left florida early for events in indiana and michigan. how did he do? "guest: third place, 14%. is is a solid showing for romney, considering, and the have to -- he has to be happy that rick perry did not a hit a homerun. he and rick barry are leading in the polls. the romney support comes from the jacksonville area. he is certainly still in the game here. at this continues. the candidates include former state house majority leader, former u.s. leader, and craig miller. this is posted by the american conservative union. it is about 25 minutes. >> good morning. we are about to experience part of our glorious future. we have been a major sponsor in washington. this is a tremendous idea. we encourage you to see you have gone through the rope. each of you have a specific number that wi
week. pam in indiana and, you are on the "washington journal." caller: thank you for washington journal. maybe there is a correlation between solyndra or renewal energy getting so little from the government and big oil getting some much. maybe it big oil got a little bit less and renewable energy that a lot more, maybe it would be profitable. -- maybe it would not be profitable. then they could create jobs here. guest: the obama administration has completely underscored that they are trying to level the playing field. with the deficit and the super committee, democrats have targeted the tax breaks that oil companies are receiving. that total about $4 billion a year. there will be a big fight over that and i do not anticipate a big unraveling of those subsidies that, given a variety of reasons. they are embedded in the tax code. renewable energy on the other hand, given this hold solyndra story, could be in trouble. whatever form it comes in, it has to be renewed on a one-year or two-year basis. so they have to fight to every year or two there is this massive fight to get approved. the t
you, mr. chairman. at this time i yield three minutes to the gentleman from indiana, dr. brew chard. the chair: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for three minutes. mr. bucshon: first let me thank representative hunter and chairman kleine and ranking member miller and others for their hard work and leadership on this legislation. i rise today as a co-sponsor of h.r. 2218, the empowering patients through quality charter schools act. where american education was once a world leader over the past few decades we are losing our advantage. the empowering patients to quality charter schools act will facilitate the development and replication of high performing charter schools that will help america regain its stature as a leader in educating its citizens. charter schools are created through a contract of local education providers that allow flexibility and innovation in educating our children while maintaining the same requirements and accountability of traditional public schools. charter schools are able to bring innovation and special programming into the curriculum that is unique
of the committee, the gentleman from indiana, mr. rokita. mr. rokita: thank you and i thank the gentleman for yielding some time. i rise to give my strong support to this measure. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the national labor relations board from dictating what private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in america. mr. speaker, let me say that again. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the nlrb from dictating where private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in the united states. it's almost a bizarre situation that we're in. an american company wants to provide american jobs in america and we have an agency of this administration trying to prohibit that. because of recent overreach by the nlrb we unfortunately need to have this legislation, mr. speaker. businesses who want to hire americans in america ought to be able to do so. for americans wondering why jobs are going overseas, it's because there are too many regulations and too many bizarre regulations that are forcing companies out of this country. just so they can stay in b
the model in indiana, leasing a state highway, and for both of you, do you think hired direct user fees are a more economically direct an efficient way of funding either extension or maintenance of roads and bridges? >> separating out roads from public transportation is an important first and getting more transparency and accuracy and honesty in budgeting. government accounting, that is helpful. i am an advocate of phasing out most if not all of the federal gasoline tax and allowing states to take those resources and spend them, because you have a hard time telling people who will spend it on roads if they see a guy doing state money, siphon off the subways and the bike paths and what not. they do not know what they can believe and what happened to the dollar they thought they were paying for roads. to the extent you can turn those cards face up and say this is what we're spending on road and public transit, subway system, and states you will never visit, and here is what you're doing and here's leisured -- not in your neighborhood. it is very helpful. >> direct user fees meaning tolls
of the house of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from indiana, mr. burton, will control the remainder of the time. mr. burton: thank you, mr. speaker. how much time remains? the speaker pro tempore: 33 minutes. mr. burton: thank you very much. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. mr. speaker, you know, a lot of times when people ask me, why do you have a special order when the chamber's not in session? and it doesn't appear anybody's paying any attention? we all have monitors back in our offices and many of our members who are not in attendance get a chance to hear what other members have to say during special orders and it also allows us, if people across the country happen to be paying attention to what's going on in washington, it gives them a chance to see and hear some of the issues that we're talking about. one of the things that really concerns me that i hope everybody's concerned about is the terrible spending problem we have here in washington and that spending problem and what that spending problem causes. you know, when you spend more money and you prin
minutes to my colleague from indiana, mr. stutzman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for five minutes. mr. stutzman: thank you, madam speaker, and i'd like to thank the gentleman from new york for yielding. on such an important subject that we're talking about today, i'd like to make a couple of points in reference to what the gentleman from massachusetts just made. in regarding the republican party. and i would say that the republican party did make mistakes at the beginning of this decade. i would say the democrat party has made some mistakes in the last several years. i think there's plenty of blame to go around for both parties in washington. there's a new crew in town, there's 87 new republicans that were elected last november from all across this country who have joined those in our party who are saying, stop the spending. stop the madness. we're working against ourselves, folks. madam speaker, i would say that, you know, we wouldn't have to continue having this discussion if we would stop spending, stop borrowing and then we would focus oe omy. it
. ask the people in indiana. we use a toll road right now. where did that money go? into the toll road? no. meanwhile, investors have changed over. the tolls are going through the roof. if you ask the users out there, it is a different story. this may be goes back to the issue that the money is put into the infrastructure, it works. do not get me wrong. good government purposes, that is a whole different story. that reflects our perspective of user-financed, user-pay systems. >> i wrote for "national journal," and i believe it was from your staff, but i believe we were talking about the real problem in these partnerships is that you have a very big investors coming in and dealing with local governments, who are not very sophisticated. i think one of the things that he is trying to do on his staff is come up with a way they can equalize this a little bit, and the only other thing i would make as a point, i was provided with a statistic, which is that only 24 states and the district of columbia have used public- private partnerships, and most of those occurred in only eight states. it wo
and crannies of american history. >> on october the 21st, i see it the name wendell willkie, a man from indiana. a one worlder. what did that mean? >> he would not be a conservative republican today, would he? >> he was not a conservative republican back then. >> he was a corporate republican and he was engaged in a national debate -- we use the phrase class warfare now. republicans use it pejoratively when democrats talk, but that is what it was, class were frearfa. will he was born on a farm and roosevelt was -- wendell willkie was born on a farm and roosevelt was born to a grand family, and they never saw the irony of what defended. >> what did he look like? >> he looked like a bear. he was a great big, larger than life, rumpled figure, who nevertheless had an aura, a charisma. one person famously said that his candidacy, which spun out of nowhere, a seemingly -- >> that he had never had a job. >> he was a jeffersonian democrat until the new deal. he said that his candidacy sprung from the grassroots of every country club in america. there has never been anyone like him. it is hard to imagin
to yield five minutes to my colleague from indiana, mr. stutzman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for five minutes. mr. stutzman: thank you, madam speaker, and i'd like to thank the gentleman from new york for yielding. on such an important subject that we're talking about today, i'd like to make a couple of points in reference to what the gentleman from massachusetts just made. in regarding the republican party. a i would say that the republican party dimake mistakes at the beginning of this decade. i would say the democrat part has made some mistakes in the last several years. i think there's plenty of blame to go around for both parties in washington. there's a new crew in town, thre's 87 new republicans that were elected last november from all across this country who have joined those in our party who are saying, stop the spending. stop the madness. we're working against ourselves, folks. madam speaker, i would say tha you know, we wouldn't have to continue having this discussion if we would stop spending, stop borrowing and then we would focus on th
by john lynch. we have a few more hurdles to jump and we think indiana maybe a 23rd right-to-work law. other states are beginning to talk about it as well. host: this is what the afl-cio has to say about right-to-work laws. guest: we have been blamed for a lot of things. constant halitosis. the bottom line is this. if forcing workers is the solution, i guess i should give up my day job and go to work for them. host: are the numbers right? guest: no, they are not. there was a study. they adjusted wages for cost of living. they applied and apples to apples comparison. they found workers in right-to- work states make more than their compatriots in other states when you adjust for cost of living. a plumber in new york city makes more than one in utah. when you adjust for cost of living they do almost $5,000 a year better in disposable income. host: why is that? guest: the scope of government is smaller. job growth is up. the cost of living -- renting an apartment is different. when you factor those in, workers in right-to-work laws are better off. host: fewer people with health care is w
the debs' home in terre haute, indiana, friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern. get a preview about debs and watch some of our other videos about him at our special website for the series, c- span.org/thecontenders. >> sarah raskin spoke about job creation at the university of maryland's business school. she noted that further monetary easing is needed. her remarks are part of the school's distinguished lecture series. >> good morning. the center came into existence as a result of recent events in the global economy. the main goal is to promote research and education that reforms policy. today's talks as part of an ongoing series by the senate. we do a variety of things towards the end of the speech and would like to make an announcement about an upcoming conference. but today we're privileged to have governor sarah raskin to speak to us on a very timely topic, monetary policy and job creation. the subject of job creation has been in the news almost every minute now. is very timely -- it is very timely. there'll be time for questions. you have to write them on index cards and they have to be legib
in indiana and michigan. how did he do? "guest: third place, 14%. this is a solid showing for romney, considering, and the have to -- he has to be happy that rick perry did not a hit a homerun. he and rick barry are leading in the polls. the romney support comes from the jacksonville area. he is certainly still in the game here. host: thank you so much for being with us. our question this morning is about the small donor impact on presidential campaigns. let's look at the other political news right now. this is from "the washington post." westchester, new york on our independent line, good morning. caller: good morning. host: welcome. caller: a want to say that i did not vote for obama because i was not a citizen. this time around i am. i would also make a contribution to him. host: why would you make a contribution? how much are we talking about? caller: it does not matter how small it is because so many millions of people who can donate -- host: see it heading up. tom, republican, in geneva, wisconsin, good morning. caller: how come you are taking three and four liberal colors in a
. at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to a member of the committee, the gentleman from indiana, mr. rokita. mr. rokita: thank you and i thank the gentleman for yielding some time. i rise to give my strong support to this measure. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the national lab relations board from dictating what private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in america. mr. speaker, let me say that again. this straightforward legislation before us today prohibits the nlrb from dictating where private businesses can and cannot locate jobs in the united states. it's almost a bizarre situation that we're in. an american company wants to provide american jobs in america and we have an agency of this administration trying to prohibit that. because of recent overreach by the nlrb we unfortunately need to have this legislation, mr. speaker. businesses who want to hire americans in america ought to be able to do so. for americans wondering why jobs are going overseas, it's because there are too many regulations and too many bizarre regulations that are forcing co
the system will continue. host: sam in indiana, thanks for helping. thanks for- >> holding. caller: i have worked since i was 15. i became disabled. i had to wait two years for medicare to kick in. my wife and i got married, she was 17 and i was 19. our first son came along a year later. she started to work, and he was getting sick all the time, in and out in the indiana cold. we decided to go traditional but she stayed at home, raise the kids. now she had some blockages in her stomach. i was working, had health care through my work at the time. she almost died -- host: sam, i apologize, but we are running a little close on time. could you ask your question or final comments? what would you like rachel garfield to comment on? caller: she cannot get coverage because my income -- there are states limits. we have no kids at home anymore. host: you don't have insurance through your job? caller: no. i am covered for medicare now. -- through medicare now. i cannot find anybody to cover her for anything under $11,000 deductible. host: all right, sam, thank you very much. along with his comments,
home state of georgia has, alabama has, utah has, indiana has, and in each of those cases courts, except for alabama and in each of those cases courts have enjoined the enforcement of the act on the doctrine of preemption and alabama stated its decision -- stayed not its decision -- stayed its decision while it further studies the question. no court has upheld one of these statutes. the national association of state legislature, national council state legislatures reports that over 30 states have significant immigration legislation pending, and so there's an obvious need for guidance here. the one caveat i would offer is that this involves the question of preemption, the issue in these cases is not racial profiling, a lot of public discussion centers on that, but the issue in these cases is whether or not these laws are consistent with federal statutes. and the court might well think that congress is going to get around to addressing this issue and it's congress that ought to be providing the guidance. so with that caveat in mind that the court might decide to sort of sit back fo
, but there is no doubt that they are under some strain. on ourin indiana, tom hunnicut teachers line. caller: i was a teacher for 37 years host:. please go ahead for -- for 37 years. host: please go ahead with your question. caller: i was a teacher for several years and we always got these government grant, but by the time the governor got a hold of them, they paid off stay dead. there's a lot of bureaucracy -- state debt. there's a lot of bureaucracy involved. i had a clause from budget that i had to run -- a classroom budget that i have to run. i have to run it on $170, which was cut down to $90 when i retired. by many times had to run to wal- mart to buy 10 cent tablets. our paper for copy machines was russian art by the administrators. these are the guys -- rationed out to us by the administrators. these are the guys that he got that money. -- eat up that money. it is ridiculous. i see these guys up there noon lunch time. the money is definitely being wasted. guest: that is a pretty common observation and complaint. some of the critics of these policies, of these large stimulus or job creat
or wherever, but you're dealing with people who might be in indiana or somewhere else in this country. how you deal with it? we're learning as we go. we have to increase our communications with the islamic communities in this country. some places, john, i think in your city, you have done quite an excellent job of the nypd developing contacts with the islamic communities in new york city. in mind state of indiana, we have islamic groups and i do not think we have done nearly as good a job as new york city has done, but smaller in scope. what this problem is very local. it means you have to have contact with the leaders of the islamic communities who are the people who can identify suspected radicals within their community. it is a problem that the federal government clearly has to deal with and be helpful on. but the real action is that the state and local levels to identify the people and try to head the mob. in chapter 12 of the commission's report is on the whole question of what to do about islam and the foreign policy measures which are largely ignored in their reporting on the report. bu
on our director's page if anyone wants to access that. host: indiana, you're on. caller: first, the chart you had at first seemed to add up to more than 100%. i was wondering how you reconcile that and how do you account for things like degradation like when the exxon valdez sank g.d.p. in aalaska went up because of the cost of recovery. host: thank you, john. guest: good catch. you must be an account yourself. what i left out of that chart is imports. they are counted as a negative in g.d.p., because they are not domestic production. and we measure it by final sales. with respect to your second question of degradation of the environment, that's an issue that's been kicking around citizens u.s. accounts were founded in the great depression in the 1930's, and yes, indeed, people recognize the founder of the, that that is a net deduction that should be taken against production, and just as we depreciate and use capital in production, we should do the same for natural resources. the difficult thing is how do weness economics of pollution? most oil wells are not bought or sold or developed by
worse. this was a study done by columbia university and indiana university, i think. it is not totally getting worse, but it is in some places. i think that because people are learning, and we are telling them that it is like any other illness and it is a disorder of the brain, and then they are afraid of a brain disorder. so we are trying to decide on how to pitch a stigma, and the journalists educating people and writing balanced reports are very helpful in that, but i long for the day when everybody except mental illness as a disease like any other. whennk that's -- that somebody with a mental illness goes to the doctor, and they are diagnosed, that almost always leave without hope for a better life, and i believe that is changing a little bit. i think they have always been told they will have to live with it and maybe they can control it with medication or something, but i think that is beginning to change a little bit. now we know that recovery is possible. mental health treatment is beginning to be, instead of just controlling, moving toward the strength that people have and givi
, fort wayne, indiana, mobil, alabama -- mobile, alabama, rochester, new york, san jose, california, and south bend, indiana. section six would clarify would information the v.a. must provide to congress when seeking authorization for a midged me -- major medical project or facility project or lease. under current law, the v.a. is required to submit to congress a prospectus for all major medical facility projects and requests. it should include details relating to construction, equipment and other costs for the proposed project as well as any and all alternatives considered including operating costs. however, the v.a. has not provided this information in sufficient detail to allow congress to effectively evaluate proposed prompts and alternatives. without accurate and complete information, congress cannot carry out its statutory mission of ensuring an equitable distribution of medical facilities to provide access to care for our veterans across the united states or be assured we are good stewards of taxpayer dollars. to similarly improve oversight, section 7 of the bill would requir
in gary, indiana. there were not many american educated doctors who were where it -- who were willing to work in gary, indiana in the late 1970's. the economy was collapsing and it was a very poor and crime- ridden area. employer contributions, then and now, they are disproportionate for foreign doctors. u.s.-born doctors will not go there. different studies -- let me remarks briefly on immigration and economic growth. when it comes to high skilled immigration, there really is consensus among labor economists on the benefits of high skilled immigration could there probably is not with regard -- skilled immigration. there probably is not with regard to lower skilled immigration. in terms of fiscal effect coming terms of high skills contributed vs. what they use in public services, they actually pay off over their lifetime over $100,000 in net benefits to u.s. taxpayers in terms of what they contribute more vs. what they use up in services. on competitiveness, we first mentioned higher productivity. but there is another aspect, which is even more compelling. it is not just a one time ch
center in the state of indiana. i've done it in a couple other areas and i think they represent probably the best hope for giving you the kind of response you want on unity of effort in any given crisis. >> gentlelady from new york, my colleague, ms. larke. mr. clark from michigan. >> thank you, mr. chair. my question to the entire panel is how can the department of homeland security best judge in urban areas ri of an attack based on the assessment that it uses now? i represent metropolitan detroit. we have a large international airport hub. that airport was the destination of the plane that the christmas day bomber attempted to blow up. there is a strong likelihood that our region could be the target of another attack. now in addition to the lielihood of an attack, the department also needs to look at the consequences of an attack. metropolitan metropolitan detroit did not use that as an example. we have a large population center. we have a border that is water, that is also the busiest ternational border crossing in terms of trade in north america. we also have a large regional drinkin
in indiana. caller: good morning. it is not a matter of doubt whether she should run or not run. she is not going to run. the moment she declares, the financial gravy train is out. host: sarah palin talks about her plan, but does not announce in iowa. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. giving us a call. from the front page of "the new york times" -- they talk about the three debates in the next three weeks. rick perry is privately being coached to come across as more presidential. deliberate and defending his texas record. rob is joining us on the republican line. caller: good morning. i think sarah palin should run it. she has actually run a government, a business. she has done something other than being a political organizer. i think she would be a good candidate. i know she has a following. she has a huge crowds. i think she should run and make the race interesting. host: from the baltimore sun -- about 2000 people attending the event. we covered it live on c-span. it is available on our website. should gov. palin run or not? caller: i do not see why she should not
that have been considered or passed in those states. utah, georgia, indiana, south dakota, the reporter talked to experts saying federal an invention is highly unusual. can you -- federal intervention is highly unusual. can you talk about this and do you consider this an extraordinary step? are you tacitly considering taking court action? >> i will have to refer you to the department of justice. not as a dodge, but i think they have a better answer to this. >> the president said yesterday at the end of a roundtable forum, -- let me quote him accurately -- you do not want 50 states with 50 different laws. >> that has certainly been his position and he has said that on numerous occasions. federal law is federal law for a reason when it comes to immigration. i have not heard him say anything more than that in regard to your first question. you might get better direction from the department of justice in terms of what actions and involvement we might have legally. >> [inaudible] >> not that i have heard him give. but if he has, a justice would know about it. >> picking up on the europe ques
in a new series "the contenders." live from his home in indiana, friday at 8:00 p.m. eastern. get a preview of about him and other videos at a special web site, c-span.org/thecontenders. >> you should always start with the assumption that when a politician or a ceo is saying something, they are not telling you the truth. they may be telling you the truth, but the burden should be on them to prove it. >> and eagle scout, held a brief standard as editor of "mother jones" and produced three of the top 10 grossing documentaries of all time and also a best-selling author. his latest is a memoir, "here comes trouble." your chance to call, email, or tweet michael moore live on book tv on c-span2. >> in his state of the union address, european commission president jose manuel barroso talk in depth about the eurozone financial crisis, outlining short and long term goals to promote growth and stability. some of those include taxing financial transactions and the ability to buy government bonds from the eurozone bailout fund. greece is the latest country in the 17-member eurozone seeking a financial a
the group in light of comments made by representatives andre carson, democrat of indiana, the caucus whip, who said at a town hall that mean tea party-affiliated members of congress are see -- see african-american as second-class citizens and would be happy to see blacks hanging from a tree. when you start using words such as lynching that's a reprehensible word, west said on "fox & friends." and giffords recovers. the idea of challenging arizona representative gabery elgiffords for her congressional seat was once unthinkable but a few potential candidates are starting to test the political climate. too soon? yes, says arizona political analyst michael o'neil. host: that's in "the washington times" this morning. and as is this article. "9/11 donations overseer of aid." host: last call on government stimulus spending, denver, democrat, hi. caller: good morning, peter. am i on? host: you are. caller: first of all, i want to say i am very much in favor of the stimulus. i am in my 80's and i lived through the great depression which this recession can't compare in the least to the devastation
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